How to Start a Local National Black Occupational Therapy Caucus (NBOTC) Chapter

 

  1. Identify and locate OTs/OTAs & students in your geographic region (state/city).

  2. Host an informal social gathering to explain your desire to start a chapter.

  3. Obtain and review a copy of the National BOTC bylaws from the NBOTC's About Us, History website page.

  4. Convene an official meeting to elect officers. You will need at least three (3) officers: a president or chairperson, vice president or vice chair & secretary/treasurer.

  5. Write your own bylaws, mission statement, goals & objectives using the NBOTC’s as a guide. (Check the NBOTC website).

  6. Make plans to meet at least quarterly.

  7. Don't forget to prepare chapter reports on Chapter events, accomplishments, etc. for National recognition and a chance to win the Yvonne Flowers Service award.

Still not sure how to get up and running....

Here are some more suggestions:

  1. Meet for social gatherings often to get to know each other and to find out what areas of expertise each member brings to the organization. This initial effort really helps over time.

  2. Decide what activities you want to accomplish each year.

  3. Do you want to have a scholarship?

  4. How much of a focus will be on community service-mentoring programs, career days, heath fairs, work with local non-profit organizations, etc?  

  5. How will you raise money for the chapter- carwashes, bake sales, yard sales, dinners/dances, etc.?

  6. It helps to talk& network with current chapters in other states: for ex.- St. Louis MO and New York State both have long standing chapters.  

  7. Annual National BOTC meeting is a great place to find out what other chapters are doing. Additionally, our national website (www.nbotc.org) is an excellent way to communicate with other chapters, as well Facebook connection.

  8. Prepare an annual report to present at our annual NBOTC meeting held at the site of the Annual AOTA Conference. If you meet the criteria, your chapter will get acknowledged & receive the Yvonne Flowers Service Award at each meeting when you present. You need to inform your member-at-large (MAL) representative prior to the annual meeting in order to receive the proper recognition.

  9. Get to know your MAL, this individual is responsible for helping chapters get started and publishing information about their chapters in either the newsletter or on the website. There are three MAL positions, Eastern, Central, & Western. While each MAL has many states to keep track of, not all states have a substantial number of black practitioners in a given geographic area to start a chapter, thus role is somewhat more manageable. MAL representatives can keep in touch with their local chapter chairs via the various internet media.

To know which area your state falls under please refer to regions below...

 

 

(Western States)

AK, AZ, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, NM, OR, WA, WY

 

(Central States)

AR, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MI MN, MO, NE, ND, OH, OK, SD, TN, TX, UT, WV, WI

 

(Eastern States)

AL, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, ME, MD, MA, MS, NH, NJ, NY, NC, SC, RI, PA, VT, VA

 

Eastern Region Member-at-Large Representative (MAL) - Jerry Bentley, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA

Central Region Member-at-Large Representative (MAL) – Vacant 

Western Region Member-at-Large Representative (MAL) - Sabrina Mathews, OTR/L

 

 

Good luck starting your chapter!

Questions : nbotcpres@gmail.com

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